I Cannot Sing You Here But For Songs Of Where

by Thirty Pounds Of Bone

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about

'It is the best folk album I’ve heard this year and one of the best albums full stop.' Neon Filler (9/10)

'organic and immediate. music you can touch with your fingertips.' The Irish Times

'Lamb takes folk further down the road trodden by King Creosote and Jon Hopkins on Diamond Mine, rewriting the rules of the genre and making beautifully melancholic music as he goes.' Herald Scotland

'The worlds of folk drone and Kevin Shields might seem worlds apart – but on this album they make sense....You don’t need to counsel or advise, just listen…' 17seconds (4/5)

'With bands such as Fleet Foxes and The Lumineers from across the United States gaining much recognition and success with their brand of new folk music it’s easy to forget that is a rich tradition of folk music on this side of the pond as well. If there was any justice Thirty Pounds of Bone would share some of those artists’ success; one gets the feeling however that Lamb is happy doing his own thing on his own terms.' (With Guitars (8.5/10)

'a vibrant collection that combines old and new to great effect' The Skinny (4/5)

'if you enjoy music with heart, emotion and lots of meaning then you should make it your duty to seek him out.' Vanguard

'What is not in any doubt is the talent that lies behind the music, both in the way that it sounds and the messages that it conveys.' Glasswerk

'this album, for all its wilful hybridity, its proud peculiarities and occasional stubborn impenetrabilities, may in time become one of my own cherished possessions.' FATEA

'‘I Cannot Sing You Here, But For Songs Of Where’ saw Johny Lamb (aka Thirty Pounds of Bone) further explore his continuing theme of place which adopts, appropriates and abuses forms of traditional music, with the hybridity that has previously gained him much praise from critics' Folk Radio UK



Armellodie Records is proud to present I Cannot Sing You Here, But For Songs Of Where, the third full-length album from Thirty Pounds Of Bone.

The record sees songwriter Johny Lamb further explore his continuing theme of place. Split into four separate locations; (past place, the place of heritage, present place and the in between), the record aims to articulate experiences of itinerancy and second-generation migrancy.

Thirty Pounds of Bone’s song-writing reflects Johny’s opinion that the folk song must change for its time, and his idea that the unreconstructed performance of heritage is at root, only that; an empty gesture towards a past that belongs to no one living. All of the music that weaves through his life is allowed entry into his songs, and the result owes as much to various trends in popular music as it does to folk, giving him a sound that is at once highly contemporary and trans-historical.

credits

released 06 May 2013

‘I Cannot Sing You Here, But For Songs of Where’ features several guests including Darren Hayman (Hefner), Al Nero and Scott Maple (Le Reno Amps), Jen Macro (Something Beginning With L), Irish box player Seamus Harahan, and Laurence Collyer (Diamond Family Archive).

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